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breadquilt:

Eve Lateiner
Untitled 2014
Dye and thread on linen, chambray work shirt, silkscreen mesh, and silk organza
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monicatramos:

Sometimes I want to fall of the face of the Earth
monicatramos:

Sometimes I want to fall of the face of the Earth
monicatramos:

Sometimes I want to fall of the face of the Earth
monicatramos:

Sometimes I want to fall of the face of the Earth
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cjwho:

GIFs of the Intricate Process Behind a Multilayered Painting by Julie Mehretu

Julie Mehretu, our current 100 Artists featured artist, is seen here in her Berlin studio working on the painting Middle Grey (2007–2009), one work in a suite of seven paintings commissioned by the Deutsche Guggenheim as part of the exhibition Julie Mehretu: Grey Area.

Images © art21
cjwho:

GIFs of the Intricate Process Behind a Multilayered Painting by Julie Mehretu

Julie Mehretu, our current 100 Artists featured artist, is seen here in her Berlin studio working on the painting Middle Grey (2007–2009), one work in a suite of seven paintings commissioned by the Deutsche Guggenheim as part of the exhibition Julie Mehretu: Grey Area.

Images © art21
cjwho:

GIFs of the Intricate Process Behind a Multilayered Painting by Julie Mehretu

Julie Mehretu, our current 100 Artists featured artist, is seen here in her Berlin studio working on the painting Middle Grey (2007–2009), one work in a suite of seven paintings commissioned by the Deutsche Guggenheim as part of the exhibition Julie Mehretu: Grey Area.

Images © art21
cjwho:

GIFs of the Intricate Process Behind a Multilayered Painting by Julie Mehretu

Julie Mehretu, our current 100 Artists featured artist, is seen here in her Berlin studio working on the painting Middle Grey (2007–2009), one work in a suite of seven paintings commissioned by the Deutsche Guggenheim as part of the exhibition Julie Mehretu: Grey Area.

Images © art21
cjwho:

GIFs of the Intricate Process Behind a Multilayered Painting by Julie Mehretu

Julie Mehretu, our current 100 Artists featured artist, is seen here in her Berlin studio working on the painting Middle Grey (2007–2009), one work in a suite of seven paintings commissioned by the Deutsche Guggenheim as part of the exhibition Julie Mehretu: Grey Area.

Images © art21
cjwho:

GIFs of the Intricate Process Behind a Multilayered Painting by Julie Mehretu

Julie Mehretu, our current 100 Artists featured artist, is seen here in her Berlin studio working on the painting Middle Grey (2007–2009), one work in a suite of seven paintings commissioned by the Deutsche Guggenheim as part of the exhibition Julie Mehretu: Grey Area.

Images © art21
cjwho:

GIFs of the Intricate Process Behind a Multilayered Painting by Julie Mehretu

Julie Mehretu, our current 100 Artists featured artist, is seen here in her Berlin studio working on the painting Middle Grey (2007–2009), one work in a suite of seven paintings commissioned by the Deutsche Guggenheim as part of the exhibition Julie Mehretu: Grey Area.

Images © art21
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art21:

"The erasure itself became the action. It seemed to suggest a moment in terms of how sad or pessimistic you can feel in a political environment or a historical situation. But it felt like a really hopeful gesture in the painting." —Julie Mehretu
In a new previously unpublished interview with Julie Mehretu, the artist discusses her process of layering and erasing, as well as the different references embodied in any one of her large-scale paintings.
READ: Julie Mehretu: To Be Felt as Much as Read
IMAGES: Production stills from the Art in the Twenty-First Century Season 5 episode, Systems, 2009. © Art21, Inc. 2009.
art21:

"The erasure itself became the action. It seemed to suggest a moment in terms of how sad or pessimistic you can feel in a political environment or a historical situation. But it felt like a really hopeful gesture in the painting." —Julie Mehretu
In a new previously unpublished interview with Julie Mehretu, the artist discusses her process of layering and erasing, as well as the different references embodied in any one of her large-scale paintings.
READ: Julie Mehretu: To Be Felt as Much as Read
IMAGES: Production stills from the Art in the Twenty-First Century Season 5 episode, Systems, 2009. © Art21, Inc. 2009.
art21:

"The erasure itself became the action. It seemed to suggest a moment in terms of how sad or pessimistic you can feel in a political environment or a historical situation. But it felt like a really hopeful gesture in the painting." —Julie Mehretu
In a new previously unpublished interview with Julie Mehretu, the artist discusses her process of layering and erasing, as well as the different references embodied in any one of her large-scale paintings.
READ: Julie Mehretu: To Be Felt as Much as Read
IMAGES: Production stills from the Art in the Twenty-First Century Season 5 episode, Systems, 2009. © Art21, Inc. 2009.
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Peter Doig, Studio Film Club
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hijaktaffairs:

peter doig
blotter, 1993
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welovepaintings:

Peter Doig
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peter doig
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blackheartpress:

Peter Doig - Ten Etchings
Pictured above are five works out of Peter Doig’s series “Ten Etchings”, the first series of etchings he ever released, in an edition of 35 on Zerkall 350g paper. The ones shown here are signed “TC” (Tate Copy) and were one of six additional proof sets. They were printed at the beautifully named Hope Sufferance Press in London and published by The Paragon Press in 1996.
They are, as the TC indicates, in the collection of the Tate Britian and can be seen upon request, which is what I did while in London in the last weeks. The etchings are wonderful in their layering and delicacy - the blue background from the first print in the photoset above (titled "Whiteout") is chine collé, as is the woodgrained beige background of the last print shown here (titled "From ‘Pond Life’").The third print in this set, showing a figure standing in some kind of pond or puddle is after a painting from 1993 which can be seen in this youtube video.
Further reading:

Looking at these prints online is fun, but if you have the time and an institution with a collection close by, do yourself the favour and inquire how to study prints in their collection - it’s always a treat to see works like this up close, without pesky reflecting glass or troublesome couples right behind your shoulder, the dude explaining his female partner the very things she can see herself “and here is some kind of guy standing in a puddle of water” and you kinda have to turn around because your youtube fail video conditioned brain wants to see the moment when she claws his eyes out and hisses I’m not fucking blind you moron but then that never happens, and the couple moves on, still within earshot (you realize it will take forever until you’ll stop hearing the guy, he’s got that kind of voice that will single out your ears from like 30m away and make you hear it) and by then you’ve stared at the print so hard, trying to block out the world around you that the image doesn’t even make sense anymore, the blue that maybe once was sky has abstracted itself into a shape disconnected from the rest. Anyway, I’m digressing.Give Ty Segall some love, if you’ve read this far:http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kkzEBdF_3_c
blackheartpress:

Peter Doig - Ten Etchings
Pictured above are five works out of Peter Doig’s series “Ten Etchings”, the first series of etchings he ever released, in an edition of 35 on Zerkall 350g paper. The ones shown here are signed “TC” (Tate Copy) and were one of six additional proof sets. They were printed at the beautifully named Hope Sufferance Press in London and published by The Paragon Press in 1996.
They are, as the TC indicates, in the collection of the Tate Britian and can be seen upon request, which is what I did while in London in the last weeks. The etchings are wonderful in their layering and delicacy - the blue background from the first print in the photoset above (titled "Whiteout") is chine collé, as is the woodgrained beige background of the last print shown here (titled "From ‘Pond Life’").The third print in this set, showing a figure standing in some kind of pond or puddle is after a painting from 1993 which can be seen in this youtube video.
Further reading:

Looking at these prints online is fun, but if you have the time and an institution with a collection close by, do yourself the favour and inquire how to study prints in their collection - it’s always a treat to see works like this up close, without pesky reflecting glass or troublesome couples right behind your shoulder, the dude explaining his female partner the very things she can see herself “and here is some kind of guy standing in a puddle of water” and you kinda have to turn around because your youtube fail video conditioned brain wants to see the moment when she claws his eyes out and hisses I’m not fucking blind you moron but then that never happens, and the couple moves on, still within earshot (you realize it will take forever until you’ll stop hearing the guy, he’s got that kind of voice that will single out your ears from like 30m away and make you hear it) and by then you’ve stared at the print so hard, trying to block out the world around you that the image doesn’t even make sense anymore, the blue that maybe once was sky has abstracted itself into a shape disconnected from the rest. Anyway, I’m digressing.Give Ty Segall some love, if you’ve read this far:http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kkzEBdF_3_c
blackheartpress:

Peter Doig - Ten Etchings
Pictured above are five works out of Peter Doig’s series “Ten Etchings”, the first series of etchings he ever released, in an edition of 35 on Zerkall 350g paper. The ones shown here are signed “TC” (Tate Copy) and were one of six additional proof sets. They were printed at the beautifully named Hope Sufferance Press in London and published by The Paragon Press in 1996.
They are, as the TC indicates, in the collection of the Tate Britian and can be seen upon request, which is what I did while in London in the last weeks. The etchings are wonderful in their layering and delicacy - the blue background from the first print in the photoset above (titled "Whiteout") is chine collé, as is the woodgrained beige background of the last print shown here (titled "From ‘Pond Life’").The third print in this set, showing a figure standing in some kind of pond or puddle is after a painting from 1993 which can be seen in this youtube video.
Further reading:

Looking at these prints online is fun, but if you have the time and an institution with a collection close by, do yourself the favour and inquire how to study prints in their collection - it’s always a treat to see works like this up close, without pesky reflecting glass or troublesome couples right behind your shoulder, the dude explaining his female partner the very things she can see herself “and here is some kind of guy standing in a puddle of water” and you kinda have to turn around because your youtube fail video conditioned brain wants to see the moment when she claws his eyes out and hisses I’m not fucking blind you moron but then that never happens, and the couple moves on, still within earshot (you realize it will take forever until you’ll stop hearing the guy, he’s got that kind of voice that will single out your ears from like 30m away and make you hear it) and by then you’ve stared at the print so hard, trying to block out the world around you that the image doesn’t even make sense anymore, the blue that maybe once was sky has abstracted itself into a shape disconnected from the rest. Anyway, I’m digressing.Give Ty Segall some love, if you’ve read this far:http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kkzEBdF_3_c
blackheartpress:

Peter Doig - Ten Etchings
Pictured above are five works out of Peter Doig’s series “Ten Etchings”, the first series of etchings he ever released, in an edition of 35 on Zerkall 350g paper. The ones shown here are signed “TC” (Tate Copy) and were one of six additional proof sets. They were printed at the beautifully named Hope Sufferance Press in London and published by The Paragon Press in 1996.
They are, as the TC indicates, in the collection of the Tate Britian and can be seen upon request, which is what I did while in London in the last weeks. The etchings are wonderful in their layering and delicacy - the blue background from the first print in the photoset above (titled "Whiteout") is chine collé, as is the woodgrained beige background of the last print shown here (titled "From ‘Pond Life’").The third print in this set, showing a figure standing in some kind of pond or puddle is after a painting from 1993 which can be seen in this youtube video.
Further reading:

Looking at these prints online is fun, but if you have the time and an institution with a collection close by, do yourself the favour and inquire how to study prints in their collection - it’s always a treat to see works like this up close, without pesky reflecting glass or troublesome couples right behind your shoulder, the dude explaining his female partner the very things she can see herself “and here is some kind of guy standing in a puddle of water” and you kinda have to turn around because your youtube fail video conditioned brain wants to see the moment when she claws his eyes out and hisses I’m not fucking blind you moron but then that never happens, and the couple moves on, still within earshot (you realize it will take forever until you’ll stop hearing the guy, he’s got that kind of voice that will single out your ears from like 30m away and make you hear it) and by then you’ve stared at the print so hard, trying to block out the world around you that the image doesn’t even make sense anymore, the blue that maybe once was sky has abstracted itself into a shape disconnected from the rest. Anyway, I’m digressing.Give Ty Segall some love, if you’ve read this far:http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kkzEBdF_3_c
blackheartpress:

Peter Doig - Ten Etchings
Pictured above are five works out of Peter Doig’s series “Ten Etchings”, the first series of etchings he ever released, in an edition of 35 on Zerkall 350g paper. The ones shown here are signed “TC” (Tate Copy) and were one of six additional proof sets. They were printed at the beautifully named Hope Sufferance Press in London and published by The Paragon Press in 1996.
They are, as the TC indicates, in the collection of the Tate Britian and can be seen upon request, which is what I did while in London in the last weeks. The etchings are wonderful in their layering and delicacy - the blue background from the first print in the photoset above (titled "Whiteout") is chine collé, as is the woodgrained beige background of the last print shown here (titled "From ‘Pond Life’").The third print in this set, showing a figure standing in some kind of pond or puddle is after a painting from 1993 which can be seen in this youtube video.
Further reading:

Looking at these prints online is fun, but if you have the time and an institution with a collection close by, do yourself the favour and inquire how to study prints in their collection - it’s always a treat to see works like this up close, without pesky reflecting glass or troublesome couples right behind your shoulder, the dude explaining his female partner the very things she can see herself “and here is some kind of guy standing in a puddle of water” and you kinda have to turn around because your youtube fail video conditioned brain wants to see the moment when she claws his eyes out and hisses I’m not fucking blind you moron but then that never happens, and the couple moves on, still within earshot (you realize it will take forever until you’ll stop hearing the guy, he’s got that kind of voice that will single out your ears from like 30m away and make you hear it) and by then you’ve stared at the print so hard, trying to block out the world around you that the image doesn’t even make sense anymore, the blue that maybe once was sky has abstracted itself into a shape disconnected from the rest. Anyway, I’m digressing.Give Ty Segall some love, if you’ve read this far:http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kkzEBdF_3_c